Sunday, July 22, 2012

Wobble To Death, by Peter Lovesey


Wobble To Death
By Peter Lovesey
1970


I haven't read any of Peter Lovesey's Peter Diamond novels, but I gather that they're more widely read than the series of eight Sergeant Cribb novels he turned out in the Seventies, if only because they're more recent. Wobble To Death is the first in this earlier series and I have to admit that I was drawn to it primarily because of the subject matter. Thanks to Mike at Only Detect, who reviewed this one a while back and without whom I wouldn't have been aware of it.

I'd bet that Lovesey publishing a nonfiction book in 1968 called The Kings of Distance and the fact that Wobble to Death deals with ultra marathon running is no coincidence. Ultra marathon running is alive and well today but Lovesey's novel deals with similar events from the latter portion of the nineteenth century that were sometimes known as wobbles.

The particular wobble under consideration takes place in London, in late fall, in a cold and drafty hall where a dozen or so athlete/masochists have convened to see how much mileage they can rack up over the course of six days. It's no small feat to win one of these contests, given that top contenders often tally more than five hundred miles over the course of a race.

Succumbing to poison is one thing contestants don't typically have to concern themselves with but in this case this is exactly what happens to one of the front runners. Which is the cue for Sergeant Cribb and sidekick, Constable Thackeray, to appear on the scene. Though the spectacle is quite well attended and even more so as the days pass, Lovesey makes it clear that there are essentially a limited number of suspects, one of whom is knocked off not much further along in the proceedings.

I refrained from reading Mike's review until I'd finished the book but it looks as though we arrived at pretty much the same conclusion. I found Lovesey's book to be a very entertaining look at a little-known segment of history and a passable but not particularly dazzling whodunit.